Antidotes to denying mundane purposes

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This page will cover a variety of antidotes to one of missions’s two metaphysical errors: denying mundane purposes.

Recognizing the unattractive self-righteousness of denial of mundane desires.

Impracticality of mission orientation. Need realism.

Common pattern in people addicted to mission of neglecting their mundane circumstances, thereby creating messes for themselves that they expect other people to clean up because they are too elevated to deal with them.

Courage needed to tackle mundane domains after neglect, because so deeply dug into hole.

Obstacle: viewing as crass. This is kitsch. Too good to get your hands dirty.

Pattern of initially applying eternalistic approaches when confronting neglected mundane mess. E.g. practicing affirmations (“I am growing more and more fruitful each day”) rather than taking mundane practical action (figuring out which credit card has the highest interest rate and paying it off first, or rolling the balance over to a card with a lower rate). “Money will come to me when the time is right.” “God will bless me materially as he sees fit.”

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      which is in Purpose,
      which is in Doing meaning better.

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The next page in book-reading order is Materialism.

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