Comments on “Cold comfort: the false promise of nihilism”

Comments

nihilism

you are wrong. nihilism doesnt mean that you dont have to care, it means to woke up, to look over the fog of society, religion, anything that has a doctine or a purpose and say ‘it is wrong’. after you die the world will continue without you, in a few generations no one will remember you, fast forward in time there will be no evidence of you, ever farther, one day there will be no man, and after that there will be nothing. the last sparks of light from the neuton stars will stop lighting the farthest corners of the universe, and there will be no one to withness them giving up. there is nothing except death. our lives are a long story of how we die, and how the world will end. it doesnt have a happpy ending. once you realise that, once you realise that there is nothing more than death and that you are meaningless, that emotions are just a tool to surviveand and free will doesnt exist , thats when you truly understand what it means.

But I want to be freeee ~ !

Bird Handorbush's picture

To paraphrase the quote from Nietzsche at the end of the post you linked to: isn’t your interpretation of your life, the world and the (lack of any) relationship between them just a function of whatever will to power is currently active within you?

If every set of values, including the empty set, is objectively meaningless, then what reason is there for me to argue in favour of a doctrineless doctrine other than the sense of power I feel when I do so? The post’s appeal to logic, as some kind of formal requirement for the appearance of ‘truth’, is a red herring. What if, following your conclusion wherein I am meaningless, everything I thought was meaningless as well?

In that case, nothing I think or write or do or say makes sense except as the expression of a felt sense of power existing somewhere within me. It could be a feeling of superiority I get from refuting the false doctrines I see lesser beings clamouring to embrace; the sense of undead invulnerability it gives me to watch from a high point as the sparks of men, women, animals, plants, rocks, planets and stars are successively extinguished; the power I get from closing my eyes and knowing that all the lights in the universe have gone out.

Nihilist elitism depends on the implicit belief that recognizing the meaninglessness of everything is meaningful. That’s self-contradictory.

I can either acknowledge that feeling as a real living force and use it to create new values with, which could totally mean rejecting the value of that force for my life at this moment, or I could deny its having an effective existence through me and continue on a relentless path of delumination toward universal heat death …

But then, there’s a curious twinkling in the deep darkness beneath my eyelids - what if, in the absence of any witnesses, the neutron stars were to inexplicably light up once more?

Add new comment

Navigation

This page is in the section Nihilism: the denial of meaning,
      which is in Meaning and meaninglessness,
      which is in Doing meaning better.

The next page in this section is ⚒ The nihilist elite.

The previous page is Rumcake and rainbows.

This page’s topic is Nihilism.

General explanation: Meaningness is a hypertext book (in progress), plus a “metablog” that comments on it. The book begins with an appetizer. Alternatively, you might like to look at its table of contents, or some other starting points. Classification of pages by topics supplements the book and metablog structures. Terms with dotted underlining (example: meaningness) show a definition if you click on them. Pages marked with ⚒ are still under construction. Copyright ©2010–2020 David Chapman. Some links are part of Amazon Affiliate Program.